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Mark Gracy
Keller Williams Realty
Andover, MA 01810
Andover
Mark Gracy
email:  markgracy@kw.com
phone:  978-984-3107 ext.1

Liz Wilczak
email:  lizwilczak@kw.com
phone:  978-984-3107 ext. 2

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The Shawsheen Village Experiment

The first mills in the Andover area were built to grind corn and saw wood. In 1775, a powder mill was established to provide gunpowder for the Continental Army. Textile mills prospered in Andover from the late 1780s to the middle of this century. By 1835, Andover had six distinct mill districts: Sutton Mills and Stevens Mills on the Cochichewick River; and Ballardvale, Abbot Village, Marland Mills and Frye Village on the Shawsheen River.

In 1919, the American Woolen Company announced its plans to build a million dollar mill in Frye Village and renamed the region "Shawsheen." Planned as a model industrial community, the village was completely rebuilt and became the site of the company's headquarters. By 1924, two years after the Shawsheen mills began operations, the village contained more than 200 houses and several community buildings. Residents had their own tennis courts, swimming area, bowling green, athletic field and golf course. The employees of the company rented their homes, with the brick structures reserved for upper management and wooden buildings for those of lesser position. But the life of this industrial utopia was short. By the early 1940s almost all of the houses and administration buildings were in private hands. The mills became a victim of changing technology as synthetic fibers became more popular than wool. The American Woolen Company closed its mills in 1953. The buildings today house a variety of businesses and apartments.
  Information from http://andoverma.gov/about/history.

Properties currently for sale in Shawsheen Village Andover, MA
  • Andover Schools - Link to the Andover Public Schools
  • Phillips Academy - Phillips Academy in Andover. Residential secondary school. New England. Established 1778. Academic excellence. Liberal arts tradition.
  • Pike School - The Pike School is an independent, coeducational day school located on 35 woodland acres in Andover, Massachusetts. Its comprehensive and sequential program provides education to students from Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 9. Small class size and individual attention allow for social, emotional, physical, and intellectual development of the students within the context of the school community. The Pike School history extends back to 1926 when Cynthia E. Pike started educating six students in her home.

About Andover

The town of Andover is located in Essex County in the northeastern part of Massachusetts, approximately 23 miles north of Boston. Located on the banks of the Merrimack River, Andover is bordered on the north by the cities of Lawrence and Methuen, on the east by the town of North Andover, on the south by the towns of North Reading and Wilmington, and on the west by the towns of Tewksbury and Dracut. Andover has approximately 32 square miles of land area, and 223 miles of roadways.

Andover is bisected by two major highway systems, Routes 93 and 495, and a number of secondary roadways including Routes 28, 133, 114 and 125. Public transportation is available via two commuter rail service stations from Andover to the metropolitan Boston area provided by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, and a regional bus service provided by the Merrimack Valley Transit Authority.

Andover was originally settled in 1636 under the Native American name of Cochichawicke, a local waterway. The community was incorporated in 1646 as the Town of Andover, named after a town in England where many of its settlers had come from.

From the earliest days of the town, manufacturing has played a major part in its development. The region's first powder mill was established in 1775; the manufacture of paper began in 1789; and in the early nineteenth century, several woolen mills prospered. While all of these early forms of manufacturing have since moved away, Andover continues to attract major modern industries.

Andover is known the world over for being the home of one of the oldest and most prestigious independent secondary “prep” schools in the U.S. – Phillips Academy. Founded in 1770 by Samuel Phillips, the school today has an enrollment of approximately 1,100 students. Phillips Academy alumni include such notables as former President George Bush, pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock, former Yale President and baseball Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti, and former Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, Oliver Wendall Holmes Jr.

The patriotic song America was written in 1831 by Samuel Francis Smith while attending the Andover Theological Seminary. Andover is often referred to as the “Home of America.”

Andover is known for its forward thinking government, committed to quality, responsiveness, and service. The Town’s governing charter was enacted by the Legislature in 1956, and amended in 1974. The Charter authorizes an open town meeting-board of selectmen-town manager form of government. The Town is overseen by an elected five-member Board of Selectmen, and is administered by an appointed professional Town Manager, who also oversees approximately 20 departments and divisions. Andover’s public schools are overseen by an elected five-member School Committee, and administered by an appointed professional Superintendent. There are also various appointed boards and committees which have specific responsibilities concerning various aspects of town governance. Town Meeting, which is generally unique to New England, serves as Andover’s legislative body. It offers all registered voters of the community the opportunity to participate in the major decisions of the Town. Town Meeting is facilitated by an elected Town Moderator, who also responsible for appointing a nine-member Finance Committee, which in turn is responsible for advising Town Meeting on all matters brought before it.

The Town of Andover provides a full array of high-quality services to the general public, including: full-time police and fire protection; schools for grades kindergarten through 12 (one early childhood, five elementary, three middle, one senior high, and one reg. voc. tech. high); solid waste disposal and recycling; street maintenance and snow removal; public health and natural resource protection; elder, youth and veterans services; a full service library; and various parks, playgrounds, conservation lands, and recreational programs. The Town also operates its own water supply, purification, and distribution system; and provides sanitary waste disposal via connections to a regional treatment facility. During the summer months the Town operates Pomp’s Pond, a family and youth oriented recreation area located off Abbott Street, which includes recreational and instructional swimming; shaded picnic tables; boat rentals; volleyball; and a children’s playground. The Town of Andover is committed to a high degree of community responsiveness; providing high quality services to its citizens, and conducting all of its affairs in a professional manner.

Andover is home to businesses of all sizes. The town is known for its vibrant and diversified local economy. With its major intersecting highways, busy rail-line, and proximity to international airports in Boston and Manchester, Andover is a true business “cross roads.” The town offers several industrial parks, a thriving downtown central business district, and a number of mixed use commercial areas. Andover is a highly sought after location for large companies representing major industries, including those involved in defense contracting, computer hardware and software, biotech, and medical products. Andover’s ten largest commercial/industrial employers are Raytheon, Philips Electronics, Wyeth BioPharma, Putnam Investments, Vicor, Verizon, Compaq, Gillette, Smith-Nephew, and Comverse Network Systems. There are approximately 259 acres of developable commercial and industrial land remaining in town, as well as significant office space rental opportunities, suitable for accommodating almost any business need.

Andover welcomes visitors and tourists from across the globe. Cultural attractions abound in the community and surrounding area, including a verity of performing arts, museums, and historical sites. Professional minor league baseball and hockey can be viewed at nearby venues. The town offers a myriad of opportunities to explore and enjoy the great outdoors. Whether it’s hitting the links at one of the world class golf courses, hiking or cross country skiing along the many trails running through conservation lands, or canoeing along the pristine Shawsheen River, there’s something for everyone. Harold Parker State Forest provides an additional 3,000 acres of open space for fishing, camping, biking, and horseback riding. With its numerous lodging options conveniently located just off Interstates 93 and 495, and its central location within the greater Merrimack Valley region, Andover is an ideal location for vacation and business travelers. Come and make Andover your home away from home.

Widely regarded for its high quality schools and community spirit, Andover has evolved into a highly desirable community. In addition to offering a full range of housing options, from high-end single family homes, to low to moderate income rental and ownership opportunities, Andover’s real estate market has been historically strong and resistant to economic downturns. The community's physical proximity to Boston, the Massachusetts seashore, and the White Mountains of New Hampshire, along with excellent major highway access, all contribute to its broad appeal. Andover’s unique combination of physical, economic, governmental and social attributes create a highly desirable community for residents, businesses, and visitors alike.

Andover, Massachusetts – the Home of America.

 In 1634, the Great and General Court of Massachusetts set aside a portion of land in what is now Essex County for an inland plantation, including parts of what is now Andover, North Andover and South Lawrence. In order to encourage settlement, early colonists were offered three years' immunity from taxes, levies and services (except military service). The first permanent settlement in the Andover area was established in 1641 byJohn Woodbridge and a group of settlers from Newbury and Ipswich.

Shortly after they arrived, they purchased a piece of land from the local Pennacook tribal chief Cutshamache for the price of "six pounds of currency and a coat" and on the condition that Roger, a local Pennacook man, would still be allowed to plant his corn and take alewives from a local water source. Roger's Brook, a small stream which cuts through the eastern part of town, is named in his honor. In May 1646 the settlement was incorporated as a town and was named Andover. This name was likely chosen in honor of the town of Andover in England, which was near the original home of some of the first residents. The first recorded town meeting was held in 1656 in the home of settler John Osgood.

The old burying ground in what is now North Andover marks the center of the early town. Contrary to popular belief, the towns split due to the location of the Old North Church, also located in what is now North Andover. So technically, what is now Andover was not incorporated as a township until many years after 1646. The villagers from the southwestern part of the town were tired of walking all the way to the extreme north of what was then Andover, and decided to build their own church central to what is now Andover. Logically you would think the northern part of the town would keep the name Andover, due to their higher stake of villagers, but fights and quibbles throughout the church and town meetings ultimately led to the elder part of town being known as what is now North Andover. Early on the general populace was concentrated together around the Old Center (North Andover) for protection from feared Indian attacks, but the Indians were fairly peaceful until the outbreak of King Philip's War in 1675. King Philip was an Indian who organized a revolt against the white settlers throughout most of New England. Six Indian raids occurred between 1676 and 1698 until ever-increasing numbers of white settlers established control of the land.

As of the census of 2000, there were 31,247 people, 11,305 households, and 8,490 families residing in the town. The population densitywas 1,007.8 people per square mile (389.1/km2). There were 11,590 housing units at an average density of 144.3 persons/km2 (373.8 persons/sq mi). The racial makeup of the town was 91.60% White, 0.75% African American, 0.06% Native American, 5.73% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.84% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 1.81% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 11,305 households out of which 40.3% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.6% were married couples living together, 7.5% have a woman whose husband does not live with her, and 24.9% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the town the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.9 males.

According to a 2007 estimate[3], the median income for a household in the town was $102,762, and the median income for a family was $131,469. Males with full-time year-round jobs had a median income higher than $100,000; for females, the median was $62,649. The per capita income for the town was $45,422. 1.9% of families and 2.7% of the population, including 3.7% of people aged under 18 years and 4% of people aged 65 and over, were below the poverty line.

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KW Real Estate Partners - Topsfield Keller Williams Realty

Mark Gracy & Liz Wilczak
Keller Williams Real Estate Partners
11 S Main Street Topsfield, MA 01983

1 Merrimac St, Newburyport, MA 01950
Phone: 978-984-3107
Email: markgracy@kw.com
www.markgracy.com www.kwrealestatepartners.com



 

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